Did I mention...

Sep. 25th, 2017 01:11 am
blackmare: (coin 1)
[personal profile] blackmare
... I ordered an Oyster Mushroom Growing Kit?

This makes me ridiculously happy. It hasn't arrived yet; sometime this week.
sovay: (Morell: quizzical)
[personal profile] sovay
I don't understand Facebook's algorithms. Independent of any pages shared by my friends, it keeps presenting me with this photo of violinist Gil Shaham, upcoming guest of the BSO, and I cannot tell if it thinks that I am the sort of person who listens to classical music (true) or the sort of person who thinks this particular musician is great-looking (also true) and in either case I have no money for the symphony and extant commitments on one of the days he's playing anyway, but I still want to know which data they were farming to produce this result. Seriously, it's been every time I go to check in on the news. I'm not complaining, but I am puzzled.

Gil Shaham


(I did not make it to the Brattle's screening of A Matter of Life and Death (1946), so the question of whether I find David Niven as beautiful in that movie as Andrew Moor does will have to wait for another time.)

writing for the next 3 months

Sep. 25th, 2017 01:23 pm
tielan: (AVG - agents)
[personal profile] tielan
Goals for 12 Days Of Ficmas 2017, in order:
- complete sedoretu: definitely complicated
- finish off Fire And Ice: MCU Jaeger AU series
- finish off 30 days of Steve/Maria series
- finish off Neighbours AU series

I mean, I'd also like to write the sequels to 'Between Destiny And Love', (currently titled: 'Destiny Is Overrated' and 'Paved With Good Intentions'), write that Black Jewels AU, and finish off 'a practical acquaintance with bees', but, eh. Even I have limits to how much I can write while simultaneously holding down a job, managing a house, and having a social life...

Trouble keeping my eyes open...

Sep. 24th, 2017 08:41 pm
archangelbeth: Bleary-eyed young woman peers up, pillow obscuring the lower half of her face. Text reads: SO not a morning person. (So Not A Morning Person)
[personal profile] archangelbeth
Short on sleep again, plus yesterday, plus the roofers will have to come back tomorrow morning because it was a little too hot today and they weren't fast enough to finish. (I mean, it's hot and muggy; go too fast and you fall off the roof with heat exhaustion. Don't do that!)

I have had no brains today, either, for obvious reasons. I did get a shower, at least. Despite the thumpbumpwhamTHUMPTHUMP shaking the roof and house around me...

Havva Quote
-----------------------Quoted by f___-----------------------
To S.L.O., an American gentleman in accordance with whose classic taste the following narrative has been designed, it is now, in return for numerous delightful hours, and with the kindest wishes, dedicated by his affectionate friend, the author.
------------------------------------------------------------
f___ says, “The fact that this is the /dedication/ to Treasure Island gives one an accurate impression of what the prose is gonna be like.”


INwatch+Bookwatch )

Dragons under fold )

remix pinch-hit

Sep. 25th, 2017 07:43 am
tielan: Wonder Woman (Default)
[personal profile] tielan
Once again, I didn't sign up for Remix. I did, however, pick up a pinch-hit at the end:
title: My God, It's Full Of Nerds (the It's Sci-Fi All The Way Down remix)
summary:Do not argue with nerds, for you are unschooled in knowledge and taste delicious with pedantry. (Or: "Steve Rogers and the Science-Fiction of the Twenty-First Century")
rating: G
characters/pairings: Steve Rogers, Maria Hill, (cameo Pepper and Tony)
tags: Humor, Geekery, Friendship, Fluff
notes: inspired by The Ultimate Question (a.k.a. Steve Really Needs New Friends) as a pinch-hit for [archiveofourown.org profile] LadyMerlin in the [community profile] remixrevival.
I'm pretty happy with this one.
sovay: (PJ Harvey: crow)
[personal profile] sovay
I dreamed I was in Providence last night, visiting friends who don't exist in waking life. There was no particular occasion—I hadn't seen them in months, NecronomiCon notwithstanding. I had brought one of them a ring I had found in a thrift store in Boston. It looked like heavy gold with a blurred device on the signet and chips of emerald down the band; I thought it was costume jewelry. It had been priced accordingly. The girl at the register hadn't been able to tell me where it came from. I almost tossed it to my friend as we walked through Burnside Park, telling him it had looked like his style. He didn't even put it on: he turned it over once or twice and dropped onto the nearest bench like someone had kicked his feet out from under him and burst into tears. I thought at one point he said, "How could you do this to me?" but I didn't have an answer and I wasn't sure he was asking me. When he left without looking at me, he left the ring resting on the bench behind him. I put it back in my pocket. I went back to their house. He was there helping his partner prepare dinner; no one said anything about it. I can do something with this dream, I think. [personal profile] spatch asked me months ago if I had ever written Lovecraftian noir and I couldn't think of a way to do it without being cheap or clichéd or ripping other authors off: I might have dreamed myself a way in. I just wish I could think of things that don't require research.

1. Thank you, question mark, Facebook, for pointing me toward this teeth-grinding article: Zoe Willams, "Yes, yes, yes! Welcome to the golden age of slutty cinema." I was a little wary of the opening, but then we reached the following claim—

"On the big screen, we look to the 1930s and 40s – rightly – for an object lesson in how to make a female character with depth, verve, wit and intelligence, but to expect those women to shag around would be unreasonable, anachronistic."

—and I blew a fuse. Can I chase after the author screaming with a copy of Baby Face (1933)? Or the bookstore clerk from The Big Sleep (1946)? Pre-Code cinema in general? A stubborn and sneaky percentage of Hollywood even after the ascendance of the Production Code? "It is a radical act," William writes, "which every film generation thinks they are the first to discover: to create characters who are not good people"—well, apparently every generation of film critics thinks they discovered it, too. I wrote on Facebook that I was reminded of the conversation between an ATS driver and her prospective mother-in-law in Leslie Howard's The Gentle Sex (1943), where the younger woman declares proudly that "for the first time in English history, women are fighting side by side with the men" and the older woman quietly lets fall the fact that she served as an ambulance driver on the front lines of the last war. Just because the young women of the rising generation don't know about the social advances of their mothers doesn't mean they didn't happen. Just because the author of this article lives in a retrograde era doesn't mean the onscreen representation of morally ambiguous women is some kind of millenial invention. It's so easy to think that the past was always more conservative, more blinkered, more backwards than the present. It's comforting. It's dangerous. It permits the belief that things just get better, magically, automatically, without anyone having to fight to move forward or hold ground already won. Once you recognize that the past, even briefly, got here first, it's a lot harder to feel superior for just being alive now. We can't afford it and anyway it isn't true.

2. Apropos of nothing except that I was listening to Flanders and Swann, I am very glad that I discovered them before reading Margery Allingham, otherwise I might have thought she invented "The Youth of the Heart." It's quoted in a scene in The Beckoning Lady (1955)—correctly attributed, but her books are so full of fictional artists and musicians that when I read of "Lili Ricki, the new Swedish Nightingale, singing Sydney Carter's lovely song against a lightening sky," I might have easily had the Avocado of Death problem and assumed she made them all up. As it is, I know the song from a recording of Swann performing it solo as part of At the Drop of a Hat in 1957, since he wrote the music. And I was reminded of Allingham because there's a copy of Traitor's Purse (1941) on Howard's bookshelves in Howard the Duck (1986). I assume someone in the props department was a fan.

3. The Somerville Theatre has announced its repertory schedule for October. I am sad that the double feature of James Whale's Frankenstein (1931) and Bride of Frankenstein (1935) is the same night that [personal profile] rushthatspeaks and I already have plans to see William Wellman's Beggars of Life (1928) at the HFA, but I am looking forward mightily to the triple feature of Psycho (1960), Psycho II (1983), and Psycho III (1986), because it is the Saturday before my birthday and five and a half hours of Anthony Perkins seems like a good preemptive birthday present to me. I have never seen Robert Wise's The Haunting (1963), either, or Anna Biller's The Love Witch (2016), and I always like Edgar Wright's Shaun of the Dead (2004). I know Brad Anderson's Session 9 (2001) was shot at the derelict Danvers State Hospital before it was demolished for condos, a decision which I hope is literally haunting the developers to this day. Anyone with opinions about the rest of this lineup?

I am off to write letters to politicians.

Progress of sorts...

Sep. 24th, 2017 06:09 pm
hrrunka: My garden in the summer (garden)
[personal profile] hrrunka
Most of the rest of Saturday was more of the same.

It's been a fine sunny day, if not especially warm. This morning I joined the usual radio club Net on 160 metres for an hour or so, and then spent a while trying to sort out some family and radio club loose ends. After lunch I tackled the trimming of the hedge on the western side of the garden. It needed a lot of trimming, and it would probably have been better if it had been done a while back, but the folk next door had also decided to tackle their side of it, and the weather meant it wasn't an unpleasant task. It did take a while, though. Inevitably the garden bin, which was emptied on Friday morning, is now full again, and won't be emptied for almost a fortnight, but that's OK.

Now, time to try to deal with some of the other loose ends that need it. Ingress is done. Duolingo next.

(no subject)

Sep. 24th, 2017 12:53 pm
jhetley: (Default)
[personal profile] jhetley
We don't have any problem with convicted felons on the NFL field, but political dissent is right out.
austin_dern: Inspired by Krazy Kat, of kourse. (Default)
[personal profile] austin_dern

It's the last full week of letters on my mathematics blog and its Summer 2017 A To Z project. Did you miss them? Did you miss the chance to put them on your RSS reader? Then here, please, read these now:

And in story strip news? Want to know What's Going On In Gil Thorp? Sure you do. There, that's what.

This pictures-every-day policy is kind of working out. I'm already up to the Saturday of Holloweekends last year! Let's revisit Cedar Point.

SAM_7765.jpg

Cedar Point's Resorts Gate, which I keep calling the Hotel Gate. It's been obliterated since this photo was taken, replaced with a new and less dated entrance. We had a sense that it might get radically changed last year, which is why we got pictures of what it looked like and mysterious things like how it sure looks like you can just go around it? Not sure what that was all about.


SAM_7774.jpg

The other side of the Resorts Gate, featuring the sign for Splash Zone, the now-replaced designation for the water park. It's become Cedar Point Cedar Shores.


SAM_7780.jpg

Glimpse of the Magnum XL200 roller coaster (the red track, up front) and the Gemini racing coaster (the wooden-support circular track in the background), as viewed from the start of the underpass. The road leading to the Hotel Breakers ran over the pedestrian tunnel; the Resorts Gate itself was on the hotel side of the underpass, so you enter --- as at Kennywood, Festyland, DelGrosso's, and Holiday World --- under a highway.


SAM_7790.jpg

Looking into the light. The Gemini roller coaster queue, with a modest number of people in for early in the Saturday day.


SAM_7798.jpg

So a thing they'll do with Gemini. It's a racing coaster, designed to send out a red train (left) and a blue train (right) at the same time. The train carrying the heavier load of passengers will, normally, get back to the station first (by a few seconds). But on a light day, they'll only run one side of the racing coaster. But they'll run two trains on that side, loading one while the other is going around the track. Because this way they get the same capacity to give people rides, while spoiling the whole point of a racing coaster. (And, admittedly, doing so with half the ride staff, which is surely why they do it.)


SAM_7802.jpg

Secrets of the Gemini roller coaster: weights! Without passengers the roller coaster doesn't have enough momentum to surely get through the whole course, so, weights have to be put on for testing. I notice that the ride crews from 1998 and 2016 seems to have signed the interior of the locker, but can't make out other groups.


Trivia: Pope Julius II established a ``college'' of 101 secretaries, each of whom was to pay him 7,400 florins for the honor. Source: A World Lit Only By Fire: The Medieval Mind and the Renaissance, William Manchester.

Currently Reading: Binary Fusion and the Millennium Bug, Beth Bridgman.

laughing_tree: (Default)
[personal profile] laughing_tree posting in [community profile] scans_daily


I always wanted to give the franchise as much depth and weight as possible. One of the easiest ways to do that is to politicise it. -- James Roberts

Read more... )
alicemacher: Lisa Winklemeyer from the webcomic Penny and Aggie, c2004-2011 G. Lagacé, T Campbell (Default)
[personal profile] alicemacher posting in [community profile] scans_daily



Long before Cheryl and Jason Blossom were the victim and victimizer within a taboo relationship in Afterlife with Archie, or respectively mentally disturbed and dead in the Riverdale TV series, they were more lighthearted elitist troublemakers in the old Archie Comics continuity. That doesn't mean what they got up to wasn't envelope-pushing in its own way for the relatively family-friendly venue. Especially in this, their first appearance.

'Maybe it's time to shake them up around here!' )

Groo: Friends and Foes #3 (2015)

Sep. 24th, 2017 07:36 am
riddler13: (Tomoe Ame as a kid)
[personal profile] riddler13 posting in [community profile] scans_daily
Dark Horse: "As the Year of Groo bumbles on, the world’s stupidest barbarian and his dog wander into those two sinister witches, Arba and Dakarba . . . who have a scheme to conjure up a giant duplicate of Groo! That means more Groo for your buck!"



Arba is the one in blue, Dakarba is the other one )

Next: Arcadio the hero.

Old

Sep. 24th, 2017 07:24 am
jhetley: (Default)
[personal profile] jhetley

Air temperature 58 F, dew point 56, calm, clear. Back to scraping paint. Old people and old houses . . .

Not enough sleep for brains

Sep. 23rd, 2017 11:40 pm
archangelbeth: Bleach's Captain Byakuya, three-quarters view. Captioned: sigh (Sigh)
[personal profile] archangelbeth
Got to bed around 3:40. Roofers showed up around 9. If that's "maybe 5 hours sleep," then yeah, this is why I have no brain.

I have 2 things I need to edit. ...gods, the roofers will show up again tomorrow, around 9 again. *sob* Hopefully I'll have more sleep.

Or at least a shower. They are not in any position to see in the window if I take a shower, really...

Kid is shattered by all the roofer noise. *sigh*

Oh, and we discovered a bad bit of construction that means a few corners of the house are going to be rotted out. (Particle Board Sux, people.) AND we're gonna wind up re-roofing the whole house after all. And contacting insurance on Monday...

At least the new gray shingles look Very Nice.

Havva Quote
M•• decides he doesn't want to be an alpha male. Will be a stable release male with regular update packages.
arcangel giggles
I__ says, “I think I'm still in beta at best.”
I__ says, “There are so many bugs. ;_;”
M•• [to I__]: You don't have bugs. You have features. :)
I__ [to M••]: That's nice of you to say, but the meltdowns are very much /not/ a feature.
E~~~~ says, “Even if some of them are undocumented.”
M•• {to I__} tries to be positive.
E~~~~ [to I__]: Even the best software runs out of RAM or disk space sometimes.
M•• {to E~~~~} nods.
I__ [to E~~~~]: <3


INwatch+Bookwatch )

Dragons under fold )
austin_dern: Inspired by Krazy Kat, of kourse. (Default)
[personal profile] austin_dern

So what we absolutely expected to see at Story Book Land were little houses for the Three Bears, with or without Goldilocks. Beehive mailboxes outside that. Pack of squealing kids running up to them before we could get in. Good, spirited stuff. And they had animatronics. The bears would look around, forever discovering their porridge bowls empty and their chairs tampered with. These were in good shape, too. The bears might have looked a little like they were off from the Chuck E Cheese line, but they looked like they were fresh off that. I don't know how recently Story Book Land's had renovations, or whether they just keep stuff in rather good shape all the time. They were looking in great shape, though.

They also had a building that was nothing but model trains. It put me in mind of Roadside America, which as a kid I thought was the most fantastic place to be ever, and which I'm still surprised I haven't taken [profile] bunny_hugger to. Maybe when we get to Hershey Park and Dutch Wonderland next, since as Stuff In Eastern-ish Pennsylvania they're surely all close together, right? Anyway, this was several tables, at different heights, filling up what used to be a post office it looks like. And there were so many buttons to press, to make some part of a loop or a shuttle track start running. If I were ever taken here as a seven-year-old I would never have left.

Not a surprise: they have a Santa's Home, with elf statues out front and a house all decorated for Christmas. This was maybe the most Holiday World moment of the park. More of a surprise: they didn't have a Santa there. They only have Santa when the park is open for the Christmas season (something they've been doing since the late 70s) and for one Christmas-in-July event. I understand not having him around all the time, but one busy month and then one extra day seems like under-using the character. They do have some other buildings, not adjacent to Santa's Home. One is a reindeer stall with again button-activated reindeer animatronics. Another is the Workshop, featuring elves assembling toys and a reindeer animatronic that's trying to work the old-fashioned adding machine or write a letter with a pen. I guess good on Santa for not letting physical limitations keep people from jobs they like, but they don't seem like the workspace otherwise accommodates that, like, pens are gonna slip out of hooves.

Surprising, although in that way that afterwards yeah, this does seem like the sort of place that would happen: they had a chapel. It was, says the plaque and the book about the park's history that I bought, a private chapel built in the area and moved to the park in the Like 70s. They've had at least one wedding performed there. It was someone who'd had a career with the park. Whether they'd be open to letting anyone rent the park for a wedding ceremony is, to me, a mystery.

Of neutral surprise content: they've got a garage with a bunch of vintage cars and even old fire trucks, used for parades and other publicity events. Yes, they've got statues of Dalmatian fire fighters

Near all this is a fine little building, a cylindrical tower in the middle of a pond, named Goosey Gander's Castle. And there are a couple geese penned into it. This is, according to that book I got, a return to form. For years they had kept ducks there. I have no explanation for the duck interregnum. But this did serve as a warning that the park keeps live animals. That isn't by itself a bad thing; many parks do, especially ones that aim for appeal to kids. But the park did have some larger enclosures, near the back of the park, and as we approached those we would start to worry that they might keep something way beyond the ability of a small family-owned amusement park to keep well.

Utterly baffling: one of the non-animatronic statues up front is Moby Dick. He's been there for decades and is beloved by longtime parkgoers, says the history book, none of whom seem concerned by how Moby Dick isn't a fairy tale and is really nothing fairy-tale-like, in fact. I would've thought they'd at least have used the Whale From Pinocchio. It's got the air of an idiosyncratic choice that, by long exposure, has become impossible to even question. So be it. What's the point of a park like this that hasn't got odd choices in it?

Trivia: The British government declared the Continental Navy's privateers were pirates and criminals in the Pirate Act of 1777. Source: Smuggler Nation: How Illicit Trade Made America, Peter Andreas.

Currently Reading: Binary Fusion and the Millennium Bug, Beth Bridgman. This is one of the more genially dopey science fiction novels I've read in a long, long while.

PS: Halloweekends Friday after Cedar Point closed!

SAM_7731.jpg

View from the Hotel Breakers of the park by night. The Power Tower is at the center; to the right, Corkscrew, and to the left, ValRavn.


SAM_7733.jpg

Old stained-glass window that's been set up in the Hotel Breakers, near the new entrance and somewhere that it can attract appreciation.


SAM_7735.jpg

Main lobby of the Hotel Breakers, decorated with skeletons and decrepit-looking fake horses, some of which shudder when approached. We don't know what the hotel looks like during the summer when it isn't trying to be spooky.


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